JENNIFER R.A. CAMPBELL

And So The Story Goes

March 14 - April 11, 2013

Jennifer R.A. Campbell

Jennifer R.A. Campbell

Off the Bus

2009

Oil on canvas paper

17.5 X 25 inches

Jennifer R.A. Campbell

Jennifer R.A. Campbell

Min and Bill 

2012

Oil on canvas

50 X 60 inches

Jennifer R.A. Campbell_Fuller Brush Man

Jennifer R.A. Campbell

Fuller Brush Man

2012

Oil on canvas

16 x 20 inches

Jennifer R.A. Campbell_untitled

Jennifer R.A. Campbell

Untitled     

2010

Oil on canvas

36 x 48 inches

Jennifer R.A. Campbell_dirge

Jennifer R.A. Campbell

Dirge

2013

Oil on canvas

30 x 36 inches

Jennifer R.A. Campbell

Jennifer R.A. Campbell

Poolside

2012/13

Oil on canvas

16 x 48 inches 

Jennifer R.A. Campbell

Jennifer R.A. Campbell

Love and Human Remains

2011

Oil on canvas

30 X 36 inches

Jennifer_ra_campbell

Jennifer R.A. Campbell 

The Girl of the Golden West 

2012

Oil on canvas

36 X 48 inches

Press Release

BLANK SPACE is pleased to present a solo exhibition entitled And So The Story Goes featuring paintings by Jennifer R.A. Campbell. The artist’s interest in the process of storytelling is revealed in painting filled with multi-layered conceptual narratives that are both personal reflection and social commentary, at once fantastical and realistic.

 

Creating her own symbols through carefully articulated details in each piece, she presents individuals whose identities are suggested by their attributes. Campbell’s interpretations empower each element to live only for the story that she wants to tell.  Playing with stereotypical or “stock” characters, they become symbols themselves. In her words, they are “carriers of meaning through their relationship to material culture and their interaction with each other.” Without text to stabilize how images should be interpreted, the meaning is indeterminate and fluid – subject to multiple interpretations.

 

Using crisp lines, bold colors, and the shallow surfaces of advertising and poster art, Campbell concentrates on the surface details of the figures. Focusing more on the process of expressing these concepts rather than the linguistic elements of storytelling. The artist builds up layers of thin glazes of oil paint to accentuate the artifice of the images, and in this way her figures occupy “simulated spaces”, like actors in a studio. 

An example of this artifice is “Min and Bill”; the portrait of a couple at the margins of society as evident from their attributes (make up, hair, clothes) who are role-playing “summer love”. The surrounding dreamlike scenery includes symbols that equally add to various, possible interpretations. In “Remember My Forgotten Man” and “Love and Human Remains” there is the continuation of this narrative of symbols. Thematic “love” includes visions of both beauty and destruction presented in uncertain ways that leave their meaning fluid. In all of Campbell’s exhibition paintings, what is most powerfully “told” is what is not said at all. She gives only suggestions that draw out meaning from each viewer personally.

 

Having received her BA from Carleton University (Ottawa, Canada), Campbell has since been featured in a number of solo and group exhibitions. Mostly within Canada, and some notable shows in the US and Australia, she’s recently shown at La Petite Mort Gallery (Ottawa), National Boston Studios (Boston), and Sarah Doyle Gallery, Brown University (Providence). She was twice a finalist for The Kingston Prize for Canadian Portraiture (2007, 2009).