HENRY CHUNG & KYLE MEYER

Be-longing

March 13 – April 11, 2014

Kyle_meyer_grand3

Kyle Meyer

Grandparents last night 3 

2012 

Photographic Weaving 

36 x 20 inches 

kyle_meyer_grand2

Kyle Meyer

Grandparents last night 2

2012 

Photographic Weaving 

36 x 20 in

kyle_meyer_grand1

Kyle Meyer

Grandparents last night 1 

2012 

Photographic Weaving 

36 x 20 in

Anonymous #72 #73 and #74

Henry Chung

Anonymous #72 #73 and #74  

2012 

Computer punch tape 

45 x 56 inches 

Henry Chung

Anonymous #76

2013

Computer punch tape

60 x 40 inches

Henry Chung

Anonymous #77

2013

Computer punch tape

35 x 24 inches

Press Release

BLANK SPACE is pleased to present Be-longing, a duo exhibition featuring the works of Henry Chung and Kyle Meyer. In the age of the inundated images and excessive information, these two artists investigate the entangled roles of visual and psychological perception and environment through their meticulous, slow process of art making. Utilizing
their own handwork and ‘technology’ as a medium and a conduit for narrating intriguing stories and personal experiences, Chung and Meyer both succeed in creating emotionally charged imageries that actively communicate with the viewers.  
 
Chung uses old, obsolete computer technology - paper punch tape - to portray anonymous faces in photographs he finds from antique stores and flea markets. Before the invention of disc drives or CDs, paper punch tape was used to store or transmit large amounts of computer data. Through a computer program he created, Chung translates those portraits into 1-inch strips of data; in which in turn Chung transforms the dots or ‘pixels’ into two-dimensional images, not digitally or mechanically but by the artist’s hand. Evoking feelings of nostalgia, memories, and an uncanny sense of connection, these black and white faces blur the boundaries of the obsolete and the new, the computerized and the handmade, the produced and the reproduced, and the truth and the unknown.  

 

Meyer blends a time-consuming hand-weaving process with photography, creating multiple layers of narrative, texture and patterned geometry over a flat medium. The act of weaving, which Meyer had learned from the women in Swaziland, Africa who make rugs and baskets to support their communities, serves as a powerful means of expression, documentation, and introspection. In Grandparents Last Night, Meyer has documented the night that before his grandmother had passed away. The history of the objects like a chest, a chair, or a bed are captured, duplicated, and weaved by Meyer’s hand, simultaneously drawing a connection to the owner and enabling the viewers to vividly imagine the very last moments of Meyer’s grandmother. Meyer’s multi-dimensional photographs narrate countless personal experiences and stories that speak of the interconnectedness of all humanity.
 
Henry lives in Brooklyn and maintains a studio at Screwball Spaces in Red Hook. His work has recently been on exhibit at Lesley Heller Workspace, HERE, Harbor, The Governor’s Island Art Fair, RHV Fine Art, The Red Horse Cafe, Sweet Lorraine Gallery, RHV Fine Art, The Micro Museum, The Rider Project at the DUMBO Arts Festival and Gallery RFD and in numerous private collections.
 
A graduate of City College, Kyle Meyer was awarded the Brandais Art Fellowship and travelled extensively in Swaziland, Africa after graduation. His work has been included in several group exhibits such as “14 A Photographic Conversation” at Casa Frela Gallery and are currently in the collection of Swaziland National Museum and Bulembu Historic Museum.