ELYCE ABRAMS & J.T. KIRKLAND

Duo Exhibition

November 15 - December 28, 2012

Subspace 096

 

J. T. Kirkland

Subspace 096

2012

Acrylic, polyacrylic on Oak plywood

43 x 32 x 1 inches

Subspace 092

J. T. Kirkland

Subspace 092

2012

Acrylic, polyacrylic on Curly Red Oak plywood

19.5 x 19.5 x 1 inches

Subspace 099

J. T. Kirkland

Subspace 099

2012

Acrylic, polyacrylic on Curly Red Oak plywood

48 x 82 x 1.25 inches

Around

Elyce Abrams

Around

2012

Acrylic on panel

16 x 16 inches

Untangle

Elyce Abrams

Untangle

2012

Acrylic on panel

16 x 16 inches

Contain

Elyce Abrams

Contain

2012

Acrylic on panel

16 x 16 inches

Press Release

BLANK SPACE is pleased to present a duo exhibition featuring painted works by Elyce Abrams and J.T. Kirkland. Similarly, Kirkland uses oak to create his pieces and Abrams uses strong wood grain images which simulate wood. Kirkland uses spatial tension through geometric shapes that conceptually redefines a framed space, while Abrams metaphorically frames abstracted memories to derive a new landscape, both confront viewers to question on many levels what they are really looking at.

 

J.T. Kirkland’s reductivist style and execution is part of his desire to strive for clarity and resolution in line, color, and form. The intention is to challenge viewers’ perceptions of surface and space through simple, precise gestures on wood. The interaction among the wood, lighting, and paint, change the experience of the work with each viewing.

 

This latest series, each numbered and called “Subspace”, includes pieces that appear precisely broken or cracked. As with his brushstrokes, cleanliness of these breaks is purposeful and resolute as well as jarring. For example, “Subspace 092” and “Subspace 096” have a carefully delineated border painted in thin, white lines, like a traditional wood picture frame re-imagined using layers of paint within and on top of the oak wood grain. The entire piece is split across with a section missing, conceptually provoking questions of “why?”. Tension between the square and rectilinear internal spaces, and the irregular outer boundaries is not merely two halves split; it is something more – it is curious. 

This recent series of paintings from Elyce Abrams is about the accumulation of experiences that construct personal histories. She uses color, lights, patterning, linear elements and movement borrowed and abstracted from images and remembrance of significant moments from her own life. These memories are deconstructed and represented in a simplified, structured form.

 

As always, Abrams’ use of texture and brushstrokes is technically complex. Like with “Contain” and “Within”, your eye is drawn to the center-most rectangle and then drawn out to the edges. Each section giving your eye another pattern to rest on and muse over. Representational peaceful times juxtaposed against (or with) periods of chaos, as well as small and large incidents from her memory are framed in each section.

 

Kirkland, who lives and works in Virginia, received his BS from Centre College (Kentucky). In 2007, his work, Synapse, was acquired by the University of Kentucky Art Museum for their permanent collection. This year, Kirkland received the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts Professional Fellowship, jurored by Scott Rothkopf, curator at the Whitney Museum of American Art.

 

Born in South Africa, Abrams received her BFA from School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston and her MFA from the University of the Arts: Philadelphia in 2004, and was then awarded an Artist's Grant to the Vermont Studio Center in 2005. Currently living and working in Pennsylvania, she has shown frequently in its city galleries in both solo and group exhibitions, as well as from New York City to Delaware to Ohio since 1999.